dirty boots walking on carpet

Candle wax, shoes, plus what you might find under your carpet

Removing Candle Wax from Carpet

We hope you found our recent short series on dealing with spills useful. The one common problem we didn’t cover was how to get candle wax out of carpets. Here’s our recommendation…

  • get as much of the dried wax off the carpet with a table knife, being careful if you are dealing with expensive or fragile carpets
  • take a cotton towel, fold it in half and put it on the wax spill
  • take a clothes iron and set to high heat
  • place the iron on top of the towel on the wax for 10 seconds
  • repeat this step until all of the wax has been absorbed by the towel
  • spray carpet cleaner on any stain that remains on the carpet and rub it in, then dab with a clean towel and leave to dry

Shoes

In 1991 the Environmental Protection Agency in the US undertook a study measuring the amount of lead dust in US homes. It turned up some interesting results that would probably mirror any similar study in Australia. It found that in houses where both a good doormat was placed at the main entrance and the occupants regularly took their shoes off at the door had 60% less lead dust in the house. Subsequently referred to as the ‘Doormat Study’, it also found that levels of allergens and bacteria were lower in these houses. Unfortunately carpets at home make ideal traps for all of the dust and bacteria you pick up wandering around the urban landscape.

Given how much time people spend in offices, wouldn’t it be great idea for people to take their shoes off when they walk in? We don’t think we’ll have any takers in Australia on this one anytime soon, so the next best thing is to make sure your office has a clean sturdy mat at the main entrance/s and you make sure you have your office carpets thoroughly cleaned on a regular basis to remove the dust, allergens and bacteria you bring in from the street.

What’s under your carpet?

You wouldn’t expect a carpet cleaning company to admit to this, but sometimes what’s underneath your carpet is more valuable than what’s on top of it! In a recently reported story, a couple in Queensland uncovered an unofficial time capsule in the form of newspapers dating back to 1924 used as an underlay for their carpet when they started renovation in their house. The newspapers, which were in very good condition, documented, among other things, the introduction of a 20mph speed limit for cars in 1924, a debate about how Australian athletes should greet Adolf Hitler at the Berlin Olympics in 1936, and how a local swim carnival didn’t sell enough tickets to cover its expenses.

The husband, a teacher, is intending to donate the collection to a website that digitises and preserves old newspapers.

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